Now Playing
96.9 The Eagle
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
96.9 The Eagle

news

200 items
Results 11 - 20 of 200 < previous next >

Teen takes late boyfriend’s father to senior prom

It was supposed to be the dance of a lifetime, but a Pennsylvania teen’s boyfriend passed away before prom day arrived.

Carter Brown died last month when he was heading home from college to surprise his girlfriend Kaylee Suders.  He was killed when his car crossed the centerline and was hit head-on, The Associated Press reported.

>> Read more trending news 

They had been dating for more than a year, the Centre Daily Times reported.

A month after his death, Suders was planning on skipping the formal dance. That was until Brown’s father, Robert, asked his son’s girlfriend if he could go with her, the AP reported.

“I was kind of surprised before he asked me, and it was really, really heartwarming,” Suders told the Centre Daily Times. “I didn’t have to think about it. I definitely said ‘yes.’ It was so great of him to ask me.”

Brown had to get permission from officials at James Buchanan High School to attend. On the night of the dance, Brown and Suders posed for photos, even adding a photos of Carter to some of the poses. They also went to dinner to T.G.I. Fridays, the site of Suder’s and Carter’s first date, the Centre Daily Times reported.

New York parents take 30-year-old son to court to force him to move out

A New York couple is asking the Supreme Court of New York State to step in and help get their 30-year-old son to move out of their home. 

Christina and Mark Rotondo stated through court filings that they have been trying to get their son, Michael Rotondo, to move out of their Camillus home for several months, according to WSTM.

>> Read more trending news 

As evidence, the couple included five written notices to prove they have asked their son to leave, according to The New York Post

The couple gave Michael Rotondo the first notice on Feb. 2, giving him two weeks notice to move out. About two weeks later, Michael got a second warning, stating that he is “hereby evicted,” “effective immediately.”

In a third note sent five days later, the couple offered their son $1,100 to “find a place to stay,” WSTM reports. The note also included some advice, telling him to “organize the things you need for work and to manage an apartment.” 

It also suggested that he sell any items of significant value, including weapons: “You need the money and will have no place for the stuff,” WSTM reported. The note also stated: “There are jobs available even those with a poor work history like you. Get one - you have to work!”

In the end of the note, the couple stated, “your Mother has offered to help you find a new place to live.”

The fourth message included in court filings demanded that Michael Rotondo move out by a March 15 deadline, stating, “... we have seen no indication that you are preparing to leave” and they will “take any appropriate actions necessary to make sure you leave the house as demanded.”

In a fifth message, the couple addressed the issue of Michael Rotondo’s car, which was still parked outside the residence. 

In a response filed Wednesday, Michael Rotondo stated that the five notices did not give him a reasonable amount of time to move out.

He cited as precedent a “common law requirement of a six-month notice” before forcing someone to move out. 

Michael Rotondo’s court filing also stated that he lived in the home for eight years and in that time he was never asked to help out with chores or household expenses.

Rotondo also stated that his parents didn’t give him any reason why he needed to leave and claims they are retaliating against him, WSTM reports

He has asked the court to dismiss his parent’s request.

A hearing is scheduled for May 22. 

Fans say Brandi Chastain's Hall of Fame plaque is a bust

American soccer legend Brandi Chastain is one of the most recognizable women athletes in the world. But sports fans were scratching their heads after viewing her plaque as she was inducted into the Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame on Monday night.

>> Read more trending news

In their minds, Chastain’s bust was, well, a bust.

Ann Killion of the San Francisco Chronicle, who wrote inscription for the plaque, called the rendition “shameful” and tweeted that Chastain’s plaque makes Cristiano Ronaldo’s plaque “look perfect.”

“Brandi Chastain is one of the most beautiful athletes I’ve ever covered. How this became her plaque is a freaking embarrassment,” she tweeted.

Chastain was inducted during a ceremony at the Westin St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco. She has won two Olympic gold medals and two World Cup titles with the United States women’s soccer team.

Chastain was diplomatic about the plaque, the San Jose Mercury News reported.

“It’s not the most flattering,” Chastain said. “But it’s nice.”

On a lighter note, social media posters were having a field day. Some compared Chastain’s likeness to Gary Busey, Rex Ryan, Jimmy Johnson, Jerry Glanville, Peter King, Jerry Lewis, John Goodman, Bill Belichick and even Mickey Rooney. Others were comparing it to a hideous rendition of another soccer legend, Cristiano Ronaldo.

“Cristiano Ronaldo sculptor: Eh, this isn’t too bad. Brandi Chastain sculptor: Hold my chisel,” The Washington Post tweeted.

“I don’t know about Brandi Chastain, but they nailed Mickey Rooney,” Jason Davis tweeted.

There are no plans to redo the plaque, Andy Savick, the vice president of finance and administration for BASHOF told the Mercury News. He told the newspaper that images on the plaques are “representations” and not intended to be photographic likenesses. 

Chastain’s bust was on a more favorable view at the 1999 World Cup. She scored the game-winning penalty kick and celebrated by sinking to her knees, ripping off her jersey to reveal her sports bra while clenching her fists. The photograph of that moment has become an iconic moment of celebration in sports history.

There are no plans to redo the plaque, Andy Savick, the vice president of finance and administration for BASHOF told the Mercury News. He told the newspaper that images on the plaques are “representations” and not intended to be photographic likenesses. 

Chastain’s bust was on a more favorable view at the 1999 World Cup. She scored the game-winning penalty kick and celebrated by sinking to her knees, ripping off her jersey to reveal her sports bra while clenching her fists. The photograph of that moment has become an iconic moment of celebration in sports history.

Here are some other infamous renditions of athletes. How does the Chastain plaque measure up?

Hawaii volcano: 'Explosive eruption' at Kilauea summit spurs concerns over ash, laze

An “explosive eruption” at Kilauea's summit on Hawaii's Big Island early Tuesday prompted officials to warn residents to protect themselves from ash fallout as the volcano eruption continues into its third week.

>> Read more trending news

More than 40 structures have been destroyed in the eruption that started May 3. It has since inundated almost 325 acres around Kilauea with lava and lead to concerns about laze, a toxic mixture of lava and haze that forms when hot lava hits ocean waters.

>> What is laze? Hawaii volcano lava reaches the Pacific Ocean

Update 11:56 a.m. EDT May 22: The U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory released video Tuesday of lava hitting the ocean one day earlier, creating a toxic laze plume.

Laze is formed when lava enters the ocean, setting off a series of chemical reactions and cooling the lava until it transforms into glass, which shatters, according to USGS officials. It creates white clouds of steam that contain toxic gas and tiny shards of volcanic glass. 

Update 10:18 a.m. EDT May 22: Officials with the Hawaii Civil Defense Agency warned Tuesday of another “explosive eruption” at Kilauea’s summit

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reported the explosion around 3:45 a.m.

“The resulting ash plume may affect the surrounding areas,” officials warned. “The wind may carry the ash plume to the southwest toward Wood Valley, Pahala, Naalehu and Waiohinu.”

Authorities said the biggest hazard from Tuesday’s early morning eruption is likely to be ash fallout. Residents were asked to stay indoors and keep windows closed.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory officials warned in an update Monday afternoon that "additional explosions (are) possible at any time" on Kilauea's summit.

Update 11:15 p.m. EDT May 21: Lava is flowing toward a geothermal power plant on Hawaii’s Big Island as Mount Kilauea continues its violent eruptions.

Reuters is reporting that workers are scrambling to shut down the Puna Geothermal Venture (PGV) plant to prevent the “uncontrollable release of toxic gases.”

The plant provides about 25 percent of the Big Island’s power, but has been closed since the volcanic eruptions started on May 3.

Update 12:35 p.m. EDT May 21: Officials with the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory said early Monday that a small explosion happened just before 1 a.m. local time at the Halemaumau crater at Kilauea's summit.

The explosion shot ash about 7,000 feet into the air.

"Additional explosive events that could produce minor amounts of ashfall downwind are possible at any time," USGS officials said.

The Hawaiian County Civil Defense Agency warned residents to be aware of ashfall after the "explosive eruption."

Update 12:38 p.m. May 20: Lava from the Kilauea volcano has crossed Highway 137 and entered the Pacific Ocean, the Hawaii County Civil Defense said Sunday. A second lava flow is about 437 yards from the highway, the Star Advertiser of Honolulu reported.

Big Island residents may now have to contend with laze -- a mixture of lava and haze -- that forms when hot lava hits the ocean, CNN reported.

After making contact with the water, the laze sends hydrochloric acid and volcanic glass particles into the air.

Laze can lead to lung, eye and skin irritation, CNN reported.

"This hot, corrosive gas mixture caused two deaths immediately adjacent to the coastal entry point in 2000, when seawater washed across recent and active lava flows," the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory wrote on its website.

Officials have told people to avoid areas where lava meets the ocean, CNN reported.

Powerful eruptions accompanied by thunderous booms punctuated the air Friday around Kilauea volcano on Hawaii’s Big Island.

The volcano spewed lava bombs the size of cows as molten rock flowed from several of the 22 fissures that have opened around the volcano. 

Update 2 a.m. EDT May 19: Fast-moving lava isolated about 40 homes in a rural subdivision, forcing at least four people to be evacuated by county and National Guard helicopters, the Star-Advertiser of Honolulu reported.

According to the Hawaii County Civil Defense, police, firefighters and National Guard troops were stopping people from entering the area.

Update 11:30 p.m. EDT May 18: Hawaiian authorities have sent the National Guard, police and fire units into the East Rift Zone in Puna, according to the Hawaii Civil Defense Agency.

“There are approximately 40 homes in the area that are isolated. Officials are gaining access by helicopter to the area to assess how many people are there and if they need assistance. All persons in that area are asked to stay where they are and wait for further instructions,” the agency said on its website.

The Hawaii Volcano Observatory has confirmed another fissure opened on Friday, bringing the total number of fissures to 22. 

Thousands of people have been evacuated from their homes as Kilauea continues its violent eruptions.

Update 8:30 a.m. EDT May 18:  More lava is spewing 

from the Kilauea volcano as the 21st fissure opened Thursday, CNN reported.

Meanwhile, state officials have been handing out masks to protect people who live near Kilauea, ABC News reported. About 18,000 masks have been distributed, CNN reported. The safety measure protects residents from breathing in pieces of rock, glass and crystals that fall as the volcano continues to erupt, ABC News reported.

Update 10:45 p.m. EDT May 17: Lava is erupting from points along the fissure system on Kilauea volcano, according to the U.S. Geological Survey, but the agency is calling it a “low-level eruption” at this point. 

Although lava is still spattering from Fissure 17, the flow has not advanced significantly over the past day, the USGS said.

There are currently 18 fissures that have opened due to seismic activity on Kilauea’ over the past two weeks. 

Volcanic gas emission are still elevated throughout the area and residents are urged to remain on alert. 

“This eruption is still evolving and additional outbreaks of lava are possible. Ground deformation continues and seismicity remains elevated in the area,” the USGS reported late Thursday

Rain on the Big Island Thursday helped the situation with the ashfall, but volcano experts are warning the situation on Kilauea is  still very dynamic.

Original report: Several schools were closed as ash continued to fall Thursday due to elevated sulfur dioxide levels. Officials warned people in the area to take shelter and protect themselves from the falling ash.

>> Here's how to help victims of Hawaii volcano, earthquakes

"The resulting ash plume will cover the surrounding area," officials with the Hawaii County Civil Defense Agency said in a 5 a.m. alert. In a subsequent update, USGS officials said the ash plume was moving to the northeast.

The plume could be seen in an image taken from a webcam at the USGS’ Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

"Driving conditions may be dangerous so if you are driving pull off the road and wait until visibility improves," the Hawaii County Civil Defense Agency warned.

Michelle Coombs, of the Hawaii Volcano Observatory, told Hawaii News Now that the situation remained “very, very active and very dynamic,” on Thursday.

“The potential for larger explosions is still there,” she said.

Officials with the USGS warned Tuesday that an eruption of Kilauea's volcano appeared "imminent."

>> Red alert declared on Hawaii’s Big Island; major Kilauea eruption ‘imminent’

The eruption on Kilauea began May 3. It has since forced thousands of people from their homes, destroyed nearly 40 structures -- including dozens of homes -- and created more than two dozen fissures in the ground surrounding the volcano.

Check back for updates to this developing story.

Hurricane season: What is the Saffir-Simpson scale; how does it work; is there a Category 6?

One was a structural engineer who thought in the ways engineers are trained to – logically and result-oriented. 

The other, a meteorologist who, at age 6, had survived one of the deadliest hurricanes to ever hit the United States, and was eager to warn others of the destructive potential of a tropical weather system. 

Together, engineer Herbert Saffir and meteorologist Robert Simpson developed a system that offered people who live in storm-prone areas a clear early warning of trouble to come. 

It’s been 45 years since the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale was unveiled, and the names of the monster storms it classifies are still referenced today – Camille, Andrew, Hugo, Mitch.

As hurricane season approaches on June 1, here’s a look at the system that ranks tropical cyclones by their potential destructive power, how it works and the men who invented it.

What is the Saffir-Simpson Wind Scale?

The scale rates the potential for damage from hurricanes based on the storm’s sustained wind speed. 

Who are Saffir and Simpson?

Herbert Saffir was a structural engineer who moved to Florida to become a county engineer after graduating from Georgia Tech and serving in World War II. 

After living in South Florida for a while, Saffir became interested in the effects of hurricane-force winds on coastal structures, and in 1959 opened a structural engineering firm in Coral Gables, Florida.

He quickly became an expert on the forces that damage buildings during a storm and was asked to help develop building codes for the region.

His expertise led to an appointment to head a United Nations project looking for a way to reduce damage to low-cost buildings in hurricane-prone areas. The work he did on that project became the basis for Saffir’s scale of wind damage. 

Saffir continued to work in structural engineering until four weeks before his death at age 90 in 2007.

Robert Simpson had first-hand knowledge of hurricanes from an early age. In 1919, when he was 6, he and his family survived a massive hurricane that made landfall near Corpus Christi, Texas. The family had to swim down the streets of the town to safety as the waters rose to 8 feet above street level. 

“The family had to swim — with me on my father’s back — three blocks in near hurricane force winds to safe shelter in the courthouse,” Simpson said. “A lot of what I saw frightened me, but also supplied a fascination that left me with a lifelong interest in hurricanes.”

After graduating from Southwestern University in Georgetown, Texas, and then earning a master’s degree at Emory University in Atlanta, he worked as a music teacher in Texas high schools because he could not find work as a physicist. Finally, in 1940, he was hired by the U.S. Weather Bureau as a meteorologist. Simpson worked all over the world for the Weather Bureau, with stints in New Orleans, Panama, Miami, Hawaii and Washington D.C. 

In the 1950s, he lobbied officials at the Weather  Bureau (the forerunner of the National Weather Service) to do more research into tropical systems and the effects they have on coastal areas. His arguments worked, and in 1955, he was appointed to lead the National Hurricane Research Project.

He headed up the project for four years then left to get a doctorate at the University of Chicago. In the 1960s, he was in charge of Project Stormfury, an experiment in which clouds were seeded with silver iodide in the hopes of diminishing hurricane intensity. 

In 1967, Simpson became the deputy director of the National Hurricane Center. In 1968, he was named the center’s director. He stayed at NHC until 1973.

He retired to Washington to start a weather consulting firm with his wife, Joanne.

How was the Saffir-Simpson scale developed?

The system of categories that became the National Hurricane Center’s way of conveying the strength and destructive potential of a storm did not start out as an NHC project. 

Saffir’s United Nations project work led him to creating a rating system for hurricanes that the U.N.  could use to try to match buildings with their potential risks for damage. At the time, hurricanes were classified as either “minor” or “major” storms. In 1969, Saffir came up with a rating system that included five categories using wind speed, barometric pressure, likely flooding and storm surge as determining factors.

Saffir took his work to Simpson who was the head of the NHC at the time. Simpson wanted to have a system that gave people common sense information about storms to help them make a decision about staying put or evacuating a coastal area.

Neil Frank, who seceded Simpson as NHC director, told The Washington Post Simpson was, “very sensitive to being able to communicate to the public in meaningful terminology.”

Simpson and Saffir worked together and Simpson assigned a range of wind speeds and storm surges for each category, and the Saffir-Simpson scale was born. 

The NHC released the scale to the public in 1973 and began classifying storms the following season.

The system remained as it was developed until 2009 when the NHC eliminated storm surge, pressure and potential flooding from the factors that make up the categories. Those factors, the NHC explained, did not always match up with the damage that storms can inflict. 

Another change was made in 2012 when the wind speed for a Category 4 storm was changed by 1 mph at both ends of the category. That was done because winds speeds are measured in 5-knot increments by the NHC, and the conversion to a miles-per-hour-measurement was incorrectly classifying storms as either Category 3 or Category 5.

How does the Saffir-Simpson scale work?

The scale has five categories ranging from Category 1 – with winds from 74 mph to 95 mph to a Category 5 – with sustained winds in excess of 155 mph. The National Hurricane Center uses a one-minute averaging time to establish a measure of sustained winds. In other words, the highest winds speed maintained for a full minute would be the highest sustained wind speed for a storm.

Here, from the National Hurricane Center, are the categories for the scale:

Category 1: Maximum sustained winds are at 74-95 mph. Very dangerous winds will produce some damage: Well-constructed frame homes could have damage to roof, shingles, vinyl siding and gutters. Large branches of trees will snap and shallowly rooted trees may be toppled. Extensive damage to power lines and poles likely will result in power outages that could last a few to several days.

Category 2: Maximum sustained winds are at 96-110 mph. Extremely dangerous winds will cause extensive damage: Well-constructed frame homes could sustain major roof and siding damage. Many shallowly rooted trees will be snapped or uprooted and block numerous roads. Near-total power loss is expected with outages that could last from several days to weeks.

Category 3: Maximum sustained winds are at 111-129 mph. Devastating damage will occur: Well-built framed homes may incur major damage or removal of roof decking and gable ends. Many trees will be snapped or uprooted, blocking numerous roads. Electricity and water will be unavailable for several days to weeks after the storm passes.

Category 4: Maximum sustained winds are at 130-156 mph. Well-built framed homes can sustain severe damage with loss of most of the roof structure and/or some exterior walls. Most trees will be snapped or uprooted and power poles downed. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.

Category 5: Maximum sustained winds are at 157 or higher. Catastrophic damage will occur: A high percentage of framed homes will be destroyed, with total roof failure and wall collapse. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last for weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.

Can there be a Category 6 hurricane?

With stronger storms of the past decade, some have questioned whether there should be another category for hurricanes, a Category 6 that would be made up of storms with sustained winds of 158 mph-180 mph. 

Before his death in 2014, Simpson argued that there was no need for another category since what is measured is the potential damage a hurricane’s winds can inflict on human-made structures. Simpson once told The Washington Post that "...when you get up into winds in excess of 155 mph (249 km/h) you have enough damage if that extreme wind sustains itself for as much as six seconds on a building, it's going to cause rupturing damages that are serious no matter how well it's engineered." 

In other words, winds from a Category 5 storm will be sufficient to severely damage or destroy most man-made structures.  

For more information on hurricanes, see:

>>What is a storm surge and why is it dangerous? 

>>How to use internet during a storm when your internet is down 

>>Why you should never use a generator during a storm 

>>9 weather terms you should know when preparing for a hurricane 

>>15 safety tips that could save your life during a hurricane 

>>Hurricane evacuation: Helpful apps for finding gas, hotel rooms, traffic routes 

Avril Lavigne reportedly dating Phillip Sarofim, son of Texas billionaire

Avril Lavigne has reportedly been dating Phillip Sarofim, the son of Texas billionaire Fayez Sarofim, according to E! News.

Lavigne and Sarofim have been dating for two to three months, according to an unnamed source. The rumored new relationship comes after Lavigne, 33, split from Canadian music producer J.R. Rotem.

>> Read more trending news 

ET Canada reported that the news of the reported dating comes after Lavigne and Sarofim were photographed holding hands and getting coffee together last month.

Phillip Sarofim was previously married to Lori Krohn, but it’s not clear when they split. Lori Krohn’s mother, Susan Krohn, married Fayez Sarofim in 2015.

Before dating Rotem, Lavigne was married to Nickelback singer Chad Kroeger from 2013 to 2015 and Sum 41’s Deryck Whibley from 2006 to 2010. She took a break from the public eye when she was diagnosed with Lyme disease in 2013, but told ET Canada last month that she was read to move forward.

Maryland police officer killed; 4 teens arrested, authorities say

Four teenagers were in custody Tuesday after a Maryland police officer was killed during a traffic stop in Baltimore County one day earlier, authorities said.

Here is the latest on this developing story:

Update 11:12 a.m. EDT Tuesday: Baltimore County police confirmed Tuesday that the officer killed Monday was Officer Amy Caprio. She had worked for the department for nearly four years.

Authorities arrested four teenagers in connection to Caprio’s death. Police identified one suspect as Dawnta Anthony Harris, 16. He faces one count of first-degree murder.

Update 10:36 a.m. EDT Tuesday: Police confirmed that all four people wanted in connection to the death Monday of Baltimore County Police Officer Amy Caprio were in custody by Tuesday morning.

All four suspects, including a 16-year-old arrested earlier, were male teenagers, police said. They were suspected of killing Caprio when she confronted them during a burglary.

Authorities continue to investigate Tuesday. 

Update 10:06 a.m. EDT Tuesday: Court documents obtained by the Baltimore Sun identified the officer killed Monday as Baltimore County Police Officer Amy Caprio. Officials previously identified her only as a four-year veteran officer assigned to the Parkville precinct.

WJZ-TV identified the 16-year-old suspect arrested in connection to Caprio's death as Dawanta Anthony Harris. He a first-degree murder charge as an adult, the news station reported.

In a statement of probable cause filed in court and obtained by WBAL, police said Harris admitted that he drove a Jeep at Caprio as she tried to stop him and others during a burglary.

WJZ-TV reported that three other people wanted in connection to the case had been arrested by Tuesday morning. Police did not immediately confirm the report.

Update 7:57 a.m. EDT Tuesday: A 16-year-old suspect has been arrested in connection with the death of a Baltimore County police officer, authorities said early Tuesday.

The suspect was not immediately identified. 

>> See the tweet here

According to WBAL, police were seeking three more suspects.

>> See the tweet here

ORIGINAL STORY: A Maryland police officer was killed Monday during a traffic stop in a neighborhood in Baltimore County, Maryland, according to news reports.

>> Read more trending news

The four-year female veteran of the force was responding to reports of a “suspicious vehicle” Monday afternoon when she was fatally injured,” WJZ-TV reported.

It’s unclear whether she was shot or run over or both, but police are searching for those responsible, who they consider “armed and dangerous.”

Authorities said they won’t know for sure how the officer died until an autopsy is performed, but she was wearing a body camera and police are reviewing the tape, according to WJZ-TV

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan did say in a tweet the officer was shot.

“We are deeply saddened to learn of the passing of a Baltimore County police officer after she was shot in the the line of duty,” Hogan said on Twitter.

“Our prayers got out to this brave officer’s family, Baltimore County police and fire and the Baltimore County community,” he said. 

Baltimore County Councilman David Marks wrote in a Twitter post that the officer was shot in Perry Hall, near Belair and Lausmier roads.

Police had warned residents to shelter in place as a manhunt got underway Monday afternoon. 

Texas woman gives birth prematurely in prison, accuses jailers of ignoring her

A woman in a Texas prison said jailers ignored her pleas when she went into premature labor, forcing her to deliver the baby on her own, WFAA reported. The woman claims jail officials believed she was faking labor.

>> Read more trending news

Shaye Bear was five months pregnant when she said she gave birth to a 1-pound, 2-ounce baby on Thursday. She claimed guards ignored her screams and pleas for help, WFAA reported.

“The guards would walk by and tell me they wouldn’t do nothing for me until I had that baby in that cell,” said Bear, who named the child Cashh.

The child is clinging to life at Cook Children’s Medical Center in Fort Worth, WFAA reported.

The Texas Rangers are investigating the case, WFAA reported. A spokesman declined comment.

Ellis County Sheriff Charles Edge also declined to comment, but said Bear received medical care while in jail.

“We have all the records where that mother was treated the entire time she was in here due to her pregnancy,” Edge told WFAA.

Bear, who said she is a meth addict, was several months pregnant when she was arrested on a drug charge March 10. 

Bear saw a doctor on the day she gave birth, but there was no indication she was in labor, WFAA reported. Later that afternoon, she appeared before a judge to seek a reduction for her $5,000 bail and also said she was experiencing contractions.

“The DA asked, for my child’s safety, that I be left incarcerated,” she said. “I’m guessing from my previous history they were scared that I would have gone back to using drugs.”

The judge ruled that Bear should be placed in a single cell.

In her cell, Bear said her water broke and on the next contraction “the baby flies out of me and lands on the mat.”

Holding the baby in her arms, Bear said she crawled to the cell door and asked for help.

She said guards did not respond until she continued to yell, WFAA reported.

“There’s not a person who couldn’t tell me they didn't hear me screaming, begging, praying,” Bear told WFAA.

Bear and Cashh were taken to Baylor Scott and White Medical Center in Waxahachie. The baby was then taken by a medical helicopter to Fort Worth.

It’s not the first time Bear has given birth while in jail. Last year, Bear was an inmate at the Dallas County Jail when she went to labor and gave birth to her second son at Parkland Hospital in Dallas, WFAA reported. She also has an 8-year-old son.

Bear has admitted she has a drug problem. She has been in jail several times over the past four years on drug charges, WFAA reported. She also spent time in a state prison drug treatment program.

Bear’s mother, Sherry White, is raising the children. She already has visited her new grandson, who remains in the hospital’s intensive care unit.

“They (jail staff) didn’t give that baby care,” White told WFAA. “That baby and my daughter have rights.”

What is laze? Hawaii volcano lava reaches Pacific Ocean

Lava from the Kilauea volcano has reached the Pacific Ocean off of Hawaii’s Big Island, creating a massive plume of “laze” - a toxic mixture of lava and haze.

>>Read: Lava flows toward geothermal plant on Hawaii’s Big Island as workers hurry to shut it down

WHAT IS “LAZE?”

Laze is formed when lava enters the ocean and sets off a series of chemical reactions. The seawater cools the lava and transforms it into glass, which shatters, according to the United States Geological Survey (USGS).

>> Read more trending news 

It creates white clouds of steam that contain toxic gas and tiny shards of volcanic glass. 

Laze contains hydrochloric acid, which can cause skin irritation and breathing problems, Hawaii County officials warned

Hydrochloric acid clouds can be as corrosive as diluted battery acid. 

HOW DANGEROUS IS LAZE?

Laze itself is not dangerous enough to cause serious burns, unless someone is right on top of where the lava enters the ocean.

Hawaii County officials warn that plumes of “laze” could waft in the direction of residents near the lava entry to the Pacific Ocean, along the southern coast of the Big Island.

The Hawaii County Civil defense agency warns that laze plumes can travel with the wind and change direction without warning. 

>>Photos: Hawaii Kilauea volcano eruption

Molten lava can wash onshore, so people should maintain a safe distance, CNN reports

According to USGS, laze contributed to two deaths in 2000.

Man beat dog with baseball bat after it ate his Whopper, police say

A Dartmouth man is accused of beating his dog with a baseball bat because it ate his Whopper.

Gregory Ostiguy hid behind a barrier in court Monday as he was arraigned on animal cruelty charges.

Police said the attack occurred Friday.

>> Read more trending news 

The dog was treated by a veterinarian and is expected to survive.

Ostiguy was also charged with animal cruelty in 2009.

200 items
Results 11 - 20 of 200 < previous next >