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Hurricane Irma: The Aftermath

Resources, closures, and important information connected to Hurricane Irma

WOKV will continue updating this list of cancellations, closures/openings, and resources for you in connection to Hurricane Irma as new information comes in. This list represents Baker, Clay, Duval, Nassau, and St. Johns counties.

POST-STORM RESOURCES

In Baker, Clay, Duval, Nassau, and St. Johns counties, if your home has suffered damage, you can apply for individual assistance. To register online, go to www.disasterassistance.gov. To register by phone, 1-800-621-3362 (FEMA)

Several resource and recovery centers are opening across the First Coast if you need help registering with FEMA. Locations can be found here.

The U.S. Small Business Administration has added more counties to the disaster declaration in Florida affected by Hurricane Irma that began on Sept. 4, 2017. Eligible for both Physical and Economic Injury Disaster Loans: Duval, Clay, and St. Johns. Eligible for Economic Injury Disaster Loans: Baker and Nassau counties.

St. Johns County has opened four water distribution points: SJC Parks and Recreation Administration Office at 2175 Mizell Road (THIS ONE IS NOW CLOSED), the Solomon Calhoun Community Center at 1300 Duval Street, Flagler Estates Road and Water Office at 9850 Light Avenue, and Al Wilke Park at 6150 South Main Street (THIS ONE IS NOW CLOSED). They will be open daily 8am-7pm through Friday. Limit one case of water per car.

The City of Jacksonville is distributing water from 10AM to 5PM while supplies last at Hobby Lobby, 14286 Beach Blvd; McDonalds, 5751 Beach Blvd; Edwaters College, 1853 Kings Road; and the Supervisor of Elections Office, 1 Imeson Park Blvd.

The Prime Osborne Convention Center, 1000 Water Street, is opening its doors to help people seeking to cool off with some air conditioning and access to electricity and internet. You need to bring your own equipment. The Center will be open 3PM to 9PM Wednesday and 9AM to 9PM Thursday, September 14 through Sunday, September 17.

St. Johns County has opened a post-impact shelter at the Solomon Calhoun Community Center at 1300 Duval Street (THIS SHELTER IS NOW CLOSED). This is for anyone who can’t return to his or her home. All other shelters are now closed.

THESE SHELTERS ARE NOW CLOSED---In Nassau County, there is a shelter at The Journey Church at 95707 Amelia Concourse, Fernandina Beach. The facility has special needs capabilities and is pet friendly. A second shelter has also opened at the First Baptist Church in Hilliard.

In Duval County, The Legends Center, 5054 Soutel Drive, remains open as a general population shelter, but is now closed as a special needs shelter (THIS SHELTER IS NOW CLOSED). Southside Baptist Church, 1936 Hendricks Avenue, is open as a general population shelter.

THIS SHELTER IS NOW CLOSED---The Baker County Family Service Center by Keller Intermediate School, 420 8th Street in Macclenny, remains open as a general population shelter.

Clay County has opened a post-storm shelter at First Baptist Church Middleburg, 2645 Blanding Blvd.

FEMA has issued an Individual Assistance Declaration for St. Johns County in response to damage incurred due to Hurricane Irma. To apply for individual assistance, please visit www.disasterassistance.gov or call 800.621.3362.

The Nassau County Emergency Operations Center is providing free water for residents to pick up at the Callahan Fairgrounds.

St. Johns County is offering a limited number of free tarps for residents with homes affected by Hurricane Irma. Tarp sizes include 20’ x 30’ or 30’ x 40’ and are available on a first-come, first-serve basis at the St. Johns County Health and Human Services Building, 200 San Sebastian View. Please call 904.209.1250 in advance to request a tarp that can be picked up at the Health and Human Services Building during standard business hours.

At Governor Scott’s direction, the Florida Highway Patrol continues to escort fuel resupply trucks so fuel is quickly delivered to communities across Florida.

In an effort to best support the communities it serves, Sam’s Club has reopened all club locations in Florida and is temporarily waiving its membership requirements for the communities affected by Hurricane Irma at select club locations. In Jacksonville, that includes 300 Busch Drive, 10690 Beach Blvd, and 6373 Youngerman Circle.

Florida Commissioner of Agriculture Adam H. Putnam issued an emergency order to waive the fees to replace Florida concealed weapon licenses and security guard licenses that were lost or destroyed during the hurricane.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture accepted a request to allow all students in 48 counties subject to a FEMA Major Disaster Declaration access to free school meals through the National School Lunch Program. These changes, in effect Sept. 18 – Oct. 20, will potentially impact over 3,000 schools and 2.5 million children. Baker, Clay, Duval, Nassau, and St. Johns counties are all covered.

A Mobile Disaster Recovery Center is opening Sunday at 1:30PM, at the Clay County Fairgrounds, building 3- 2497 State Road 16, Green Cove Springs. This center is open from 8AM to 8PM every day beginning Monday, September 25th, offering you in person support and assistance for both individuals and businesses. That includes helping you register for federal disaster assistance, applying for Small Business Administration loans, giving you updates on your specific case, processing appeals, and connecting you with state program information.

HOTLINES

Individuals needing assistance with clean-up on their private property are encouraged to contact Crisis Cleanup at 1-800-451-1954. As they are able, reputable and vetted relief agencies may assist you and your neighbors cut fallen trees, remove drywall, insulation, flooring, furniture, appliances, tarp roofs, etc. All services are free, but service is not guaranteed due to the overwhelming need.

Attorney General Pam Bondi has opened up a Price Gouging Hotline: (866) 9-NO-SCAM.

Florida Emergency Information Hotline for all state residents: 1-800-342-3557.

The Department of Financial Services (DFS) has launched a Hurricane Irma insurance information hotline: 1-877-MY-FL-CFO.

St. Johns County Emergency Management has opened a hotline for residents to call about county services, storm response, and events: (904) 824-5550.

St. Johns County has also launched a Building Services Structural Hotline at (904) 827-6836.

Clay County Call Center 904-284-7703

JTA Customer Service 5:30AM through 8:30PM 904.630.3100 or TTY 904.630.3191.

Hotline for storm-related questions and problems in Jacksonville is 904-630-CITY

In Nassau County, iIf you have any questions or concerns not addressed, please contact our Citizens Information Center at 1-904-548-0900.

JEA Customer Care Consultants: 904.655.6000 or 800.683.5542- Consultants are able to give customers an idea of when a crew will be assigned to their area or circuit, according to JEA’s CEO, but it doesn’t guarantee when it will happen or when power will be restored. Consultants are also able to answer questions about why their power outage map shows you have power when you do not.  

JEA and United Way- All counties: 2.1.1 or 904.632.0600- Customers without power are able to call this line seeking assistance, and JEA says they will work to try and transfer those to an agency that might be able to provide essential needs.

Florida Blue, in partnership with New Directions Behavioral Health, is offering emotional support to individuals and loved ones affected by Hurricane Irma. The companies are providing community access to specially trained behavioral health counselors via a 24-hour, toll-free help line: 800-843-6514.

K-12 SCHOOLS

Duval County Schools:

Duval County Public Schools will be closed on Friday, September 8 through Friday, September 15. School offices, after-school activities, and extended day care will also be closed those days. They aim to reopen on Monday.

High School football games that had to be rescheduled because of Irma will now take place at the following days and times: Paxon v Yulee, 9/18 at 6PM at Paxon; Fletcher v Atlantic Coast, 9/18 at 6PM at Fletcher; Wolfson v Fernandina, 9/18 at 7PM at Wolfson; Westside v Ponte Vedra, 9/18 at 6PM at Westside; Lee v Columbia, 9/19 at 6PM at Lee; Mandarin v Deland, 9/19 at 6PM at Mandarin; Sandalwood v Spruce Creek, 9/19 at 6PM at Sandalwood; Terry Parker v Bishop Kenny, 9/22 at 7PM at Bishop Kenny; Ed White v Nease, 10/6 at 7PM at Ed White; Ribault v Suwanee, 10/10 at 7PM at Suwanee; Eglewood v Middleburg, 10/17 at 7PM at Endlewood; Baldwin v Stanton, 10/30 at 6PM at Baldwin.

The Catholic Diocese of St. Augustine has announced all Diocesan schools will be closed Friday 9/8 through Wednesday 9/13. The only schools that will not open Sept. 14 are Blessed Trinity, Cathedral Parish School and Early Learning Center, Christ the King, Morning Star and Morning Star High School, San Jose and San Juan del Rio.

The Salvation Army of Northeast Florida's Child Development Center at 318 N. Ocean St. will be closed on Friday, September 8, and Monday, September 11, and Tuesday, September 12. The center will remain closed for all dates that Duval County schools are closed.

The Jericho School for Children with Autism will be closed on Friday, September 8 through Wednesday, September 13. School resumes Thursday, September 14.

Beaches Episcopal School cancels all after school activities Thursday. School will be closed Friday, September 8 through Wednesday, September 13. Classes will resume Thursday.  The first hurricane make-up day will be Thursday, November 9th, which was initially a Teacher Planning Day. 

Jacksonville Country Day School will be closed on Friday, September 8, through Wednesday, September 13.  Extended Care and all after school activities, including Sharks basketball games, are also canceled on those days. They are reopening Thursday, September 14th.

The Bolles School is closed through Wednesday. It will reopen Thursday.

Bishop Kenny High School resumes classes Thursday.

Arlington Community Academy Elementary is closed through Wednesday, September 13th. They are opening Thursday.

Clay County Schools:

All Clay schools will be closed Friday, September 8, through Friday, September 15th. School administrators are asked to report to their schools to assess damage on Thursday, September 14th. Transportation mechanics will report to the Middleburg compound on Thursday. Maintenance Staff will report to Operations on Thursday. Cafeteria Managers will report to their schools on Friday, September 15th.

School board meeting on September 7 was canceled. The board plans to hold two meetings to make up for the cancellation, one on the 18th and one on the 26th.

High School football makeup games: Clay High v Orange Park High, Oct 6th at 7PM at Orange Park High; Fleming Island High v Bucholz High, Sept 18th at 7PM at Fleming Island High; Middleburg High v Englewood High, Oct 17 at 7PM at Englewood High; Oakleaf High v Bartram Trail High, Oct 6 at 7PM at Bartram Trail High School; Orange Park High v Clay High, Oct 6 at 7PM at Orange Park High; Ridgeview High v Palatka High, Sept 18 at 7PM at Palatka High. Keystone Heights High v Umatilla High has been canceled.

Nassau County Schools:

All public schools and district offices in the district will be closed Friday, September 8 through Thursday, September, 14th. 12-month employees should report to work Thursday, September 14th, if possible. Classes will resume Friday.

St. Johns County Schools:

All schools will be closed Friday, Stepember 8, through Friday, September,15th. Schools will reopen Monday.

All extracurricular and interscholastic activities have been canceled starting Friday, September 8th.  All St. Johns County after-school programs held at the Ketterlinus Gym and the W. E. Harris Community Center will resume on Monday, September 18 to coincide with schools reopening

Baker County Schools:

Baker County Public Schools are closed Friday, September 8, through Monday, September 18. Classes will resume Tuesday.

COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

Jacksonville University will be closed Friday, September 8, through Friday, September 15. Normal activities resume Monday, September 18th.

FSCJ will be closed from Friday, September 8, and remain closed through Sunday the 17th. Classes are set to resume Monday, September, 18, at regularly scheduled times.

The Florida School for the Deaf and Blind has canceled classes Thursday September 7 through the weekend. Classes will resume on Monday, September 18th. 

Florida Coastal School of Law will resume classes Monday, Septemeber 18. 

University of North Florida classes, including online classes, have been canceled from Friday, September 8, through Wednesday, September 13th. Class at the University of North Florida will resume on Thursday, Sept. 14. Offices will reopen , Wednesday, Sept. 13, 

Edward Waters College will close Friday, September 8 and reopen Wednesday, September 13. Any classes, activities, or events that are scheduled to be held on campus between Sept. 8 and Sept. 12 have been cancelled. 

The Edward Waters College Football Game Saturday, September 16th has been moved to University Christian School at 5520 University Blvd. It will take place at 4:30PM agaisnt Cumberland.

St. Johns River State College campuses will be closed Friday, September 8. The College and classes will resume Monday, September 18.

Flagler College closed Friday, September 8. Residence halls was opening Sunday, September 16th, and classes are resuming Monday, September 18th.

TRANSPORTATION

The County Road 218 Bridge east of Blanding in Clay County is closed for emergency repairs.

The Roscoe Boulevard Bridge in St. Johns County is closed for emergency repairs.

The Heckscher Drive Bridge at Browns Creek has reopened following emergency repairs.

All of Duval County’s major bridges are now open, including Jacksonville’s Intracoastal bridges- Wonderwood, Beach, Atlantic, and JTB- the Acosta, Main Street, Dames Point, Hart, Mathews, and the Buckman Bridge have reopened, but you still need to drive with caution.

The Black Creek Bridge on 218 in Clay County is back open.

All St. Johns County bridges have reopened as of 11 am, Tuesday, September 12. Everyone is asked to be cautious of standing water hazards and debris obstructions.

The Jacksonville International Airport ended operations Saturday 9/9 at 7pm. The airport reopened Tuesday. Flight ops are expected to gradually ramp up, and you should contact your airline for the most up-to-date flight information

The Skyway will close at 9 p.m. on Friday, September 8 and reopen Wednesday, September 13th.

The St. Johns River Ferry is scheduled to close after normal service on Thursday, September 7th, to relocate the boat inland. Service is resuming Thursday, September 14th.

All JTA Bus Routes are back in service as of Wednesday, September 13. There may still be some detours.

St. Johns County Council on Aging (COA) will resume normal paratransit tomorrow, September 14th.

COA Sunshine Bus Service will resume today, Wednesday, September 13th beginning with the regularly scheduled afternoon runs on the following lines: Red, Blue, Purple, Orange, Green, Teal and Connector. Full hours of service on the above listed lines will resume Thursday, September 14th. The Hastings Circular will not run until the roads are deemed safe for travel.

All construction work by the Florida Department of Transportation has been suspended temporarily because of the storm.

Northeast Florida Regional Airport closed at 6PM Saturday. The airport opened to fixed wing aircraft Tuesday, September 12th. It’s also open and operational for helicopter traffic.

Cargo operations at JAXPORT owned terminals ended at 11:59PM Friday. The Port of Jacksonville in its entirety- including private terminals- closed Saturday at 8PM. JAXPORT terminals and gates are now open, and the Coast Guard has cleared the entire Port of Jacksonville.

GOVERNMENT

All State of Florida offices will be closed on Friday, September 8.

FDLE offices in Nassau and St. Johns are closed Wednesday, September 13. The Nassau County office remains closed Thursday, September 14th.

All City of Jacksonville offices will be closed Friday, Monday, and Tuesday. Non-essential city services are also called off for those days.City services resume as normal Wednesday.

All Jacksonville Public Library branches resume operations on Wednesday, Sept. 13. Overdue fines will be waived for items due when the library is closed.

All St. Johns County library branches are open and available for residents and visitors to enjoy air conditioning, outlets to charge phones and devices, and other media services.

The Clay County Animal Shelter evacuated because of Black Creek flooding. It will remain closed until further notice. If you need Animal Control assistance, call 904-269-6342 or email animalcontrol@claycountygov.com.

The Florida Department of Corrections is canceling weekend visitation at all institutions for Saturday, September 9, and Sunday, September 10.

All Duval County Tax Collector branch locations will close at noon on Thursday, September 7th. They reopened with limited staffing Wednesday, September 13th.

All administrative offices in St. Johns County, the City of St. Augustine, and the City of St. Augustine Beach will be closed Tuesday, September 12. St. Johns County Administration Offices resume standard operations Thursday. The City of St. Augustine will open as power is restored. All administration offices, libraries, pet center, and recreational facilities will be open for standard business hours.

The Duval County Clerk of Courts closed on Friday, September 8. The Chief Judge has ordered the Courthouse remain closed the rest of the week, as well as the Clerk’s Office. Regular hours should resume Monday, September 18th.

The Fourth Circuit State Attorney’s Office is reopening Thursday, September 14th.

Nassau County courts are closed through Thursday, September 14th. All perspective jurors who received summons to report to the Robert M. Foster Justice Center on Friday September 15, 2017 are excused and should not report. The summons will not be reissued. 

Baker County courts closed through Tuesday, September 13th, and reopened Wednesday, September 13th.

St. Johns County Courts closed Friday September 8th, and reopen Thursday, September 14th.

The Clay County Courthouse and all Clerk of the Circuit Court branch offices in Clay County closed on Friday, September 8th. Court dates and services originally scheduled for these dates are impacted and have been rescheduled. Courts plan to reopen Thursday, September 14th.

The United States Bankruptcy Court Jacksonville Division will be closed on Friday, September 8 and Monday, September 11, 2017.

Naval Station Mayport is open to unrestricted traffic as of noon Wednesday, through the main gate. The Emergency Assistance Center is open at the base Fleet and Family Support Center (Bldg 1). You can also contact the Fleet and Family Support Center at 270-6600. The off base commissary and Navy Exchange are open at their normal hours.

NAS Jax is opening for normal working hours Wednesday, September 13th.

Members of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Regional Call Center (RCC) are headed to Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola Sept. 8, to relocate operations before Hurricane Irma reaches the Jacksonville, Florida area. NAS Jacksonville is telling personnel to shelter in place from 7PM Sunday through noon Monday.

PARKS AND BEACHES

Clay County is closing all boat ramps until Monday, September 18.

The Jacksonville Zoo will open Thursday, September 14th.

The St. Augustine Alligator Farm is opening Thursday, September 14th.

The Castillo de San Marcos in St. Augustine is closed from Thursday, September 7, until further notice.

Fort Matanzas in St. Augustine is closed from Thursday, September 7, until further notice.

The Jacksonville Beach Golf Course will reopen Thursday, September 14th. The driving range remains closed.

The large dog park at Paws Dog Park in Jax Beach has reopened. The small dog park previously reopened.

Due to significant damage, erosion, and debris, as a result of Hurricane Irma, St. Johns County is urging all residents and visitors to avoid the beach, beach access points, and walkovers until further notice. Swimming in the ocean is also discouraged due to high surf, rip currents, and debris

The following St. Johns County Parks and Recreation Facilities are closed pending inspections due to Hurricane Irma: Alpine Groves Park, Shands Pier, Riverdale Picnic Area, Bird Island Park, Canopy Park, Vail Park, Palmo Dock, Collier-Blocker-Puryear Park, Solomon Calhoun Center, Ketterlinus Gym, St. John's County Ocean and Fishing Pier, Nease Beachfront Park

Jacksonville’s beaches are open, but you’re urged to use extreme caution and not go in the water at this time because of rough conditions and debris.

The St. Johns Golf Club will reopen Friday, September 15th.

The Slammer & Squire at World Golf Village is closed until further notice.

The Solomon Calhoun Community Center and pool will remain closed through Wednesday, September 20 as it remains a post-impact shelter for residents affected by Hurricane Irma.

The main parking garage in St. Augustine open Thursday, September 14th. $12/day fees will apply.

All Florida Park Service state parks have reopened

EVENTS

The Ponte Vedra Auto Show has been rescheduled for Sunday, September 24 and will take place at the Nocatee Town Center. It was originally planned for September 10.

The Riverside Arts Market on September 9th has been canceled. The market is anticipated to return to normal operations on September 16. 

The Bryan Adams show at Daily's Place on Saturday, Sept. 9 has been postponed.

Sing Out Loud Festival dates have been canceled on September 8th, September 9th, and September 10th. The Sing Out Loud festival scheduled for September 15 through 17 will continue as planned this weekend with minimal stage relocations or show cancellations. Please see the updated schedule below for concert venue details. For more information regarding the Sing Out Loud festival, please visit www.singoutloudfestival.com.

The Adam Ant: Anthems Tour at the Florida Theatre on Sunday, September 10 has been postponed. Florida Theatre shows scheduled for Saturday September 23rd and beyond will continue as planned.

Events scheduled in Jacksonville Beach this weekend of 9/9 have been canceled, including BRUVAL, Chemo Noir 1K Run, and the Travis Manion 9/11 Heroes Run.

The Jax Armada is canceling the match on Saturday, September 9th. It's being rescheduled for September 27.

St.Augustine Amphitheatre is canceling the Modest Mouse concert set for Thursday, September 7. The Blackberry Smoke concert on Friday, September 8, has been postponed. This Friday-Sunday,  9/15-17, Widespread Panic concerts at the St. Augustine Amphitheatre will proceed as originally scheduled.

The Jacksonville Jumbo Shrimp will not host any playoff games. Playoff tickets already purchased can be refunded.

The FSCJ Artist Series kickoff event for Wednesday, September 13, has been canceled.

Thursday September 7 night concerts at The Landing has been postponed.

The Jacksonville Humane Society’s Toast to the Animals has been canceled.

The International Coastal Cleanup scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 16, is cancelled.

The Clay County Sheriff’s Office Zone 4 (Middleburg/Clay Hill) SheriffsNET Meeting for 9/14 has been canceled.

In the aftermath of Hurricane Irma and to help affected Creators, One Spark and Bold Events are postponing the One Spark 2017 Innovation Festival until the spring of 2018. This year’s event has been rescheduled to take place on Friday, April 6 and Saturday, April 7, at EverBank Field, with a kickoff concert to be hosted by Bold Events at the new Daily’s Place amphitheater on Thursday, April 5.

The St. Augustine Amphitheater has canceled the September 8 Blackberry Smoke and Chris Robinson Brotherhood concert event. Refunds will be granted at point of purchase.

BUSINESSES

All First Coast YMCA’s are now open, YMCA Afterschool prorams will resume when schools reopen, but some locations are offering camp: Duval County 9/14-15, duPont YMCA Youth Development Campus; in Clay County 9/13-15, Barco-Newton Family YMCA and Dye Clay Family YMCA; in Nassau County 9/14, Callahan Center and Yulee Kids Campus; in St. Johns County 9/14-15, Ponte Vedra YMCA.

All SMG Jacksonville Box Offices & Administrative Offices are closed. They will resume normal business hours on Tuesday, September 13.

All Florida Blue Centers in Jacksonville- Town Center, River City Marketplace, and Winston YMCA will be closed on Saturday, September 9.

MOCA Jacksonville and NOLA MOCA will close at 9pm Thursday, September 7 and will remain closed until further notice.

Jacksonville Symphony administrative and ticket office in the Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts closed 2pm today, Thursday, Sept. 7th. The office opened Wednesday, September 13. 

All VyStar Credit Union branch locations, call center, and operations will be closed Saturday, Monday, and Tuesday.

The Jacksonville Humane Society is closing 1PM Saturday through Monday. They are reopening Thursday, September 14.

JIA USO closed 11:00 AM Thursday, September 7.  NAS USO close at 5:00 PM Thursday, September 7, and Mayport USO closed at 9:00 PM Thursday, September 7. They opened Tuesday, September 12 and Wednesday, September 13.

SAPA Extrusions is closing their plant in St. Augustine Friday at 3pm.

Jax Federal Credit Union branches will be closed Saturday, September 9 through Tuesday, September 12.

All Clay Electric district offices will be closed to the public Monday, Sept. 11 and Tuesday, Sept. 12 so personnel can focus on restoration efforts after Hurricane Irma.

Northrop Grumman employees impacted by Hurricane Irma who need assistance or information can call 1-800-995-4318, or continue to visit www.northropgrumman.com/emergency for updates. The Northrop Grumman site in St. Augustine is closed on Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017. 

HOSPITALS AND MEDICAL OFFICES

Both Baptist Beaches and Nassau Medical Center ERs and hospitals have reopened after they were evacuated because of the storm. Both will resume full operations by Wednesday, September 13th, at 8AM.

St. Vincent's Riverside facility transferred their most clinically appropriate patients to St. Vincent's Southside and St. Vincent's Clay County on September 11, due to flooding in the area.

Alignment Healthcare at 3520 St. Johns Bluff, which serves Florida Blue Preferred HMO Medicare members, will reopen tomorrow, Sept. 14. The location at 5500 Blanding Road will be closed the remainder of this week due to flooding and anticipates reopening next week. All patient appointments are being rescheduled or relocated to the St. Johns Bluff location.

UF Health Jacksonville remains open. They have sent medical staff to shelters to help as needed.

PRE-STORM EVACUATIONS

ALL CURFEWS IN NORTHEAST FLORIDA HAVE NOW BEEN LIFTED

Jacksonville’s Mayor has issued a mandatory evacuation for anyone living in Zone A or Zone B evacuate. The mandatory evacuation has also been extended for people living in mobile homes, or in low-lying areas.

Nassau County has issued mandatory evacuations for anyone in Zones A,C, or F, with the order going into effect Friday, September 8, at 6 PM.

St. Johns County has mandatory evacuations for anyone in Zones A and B, which includes St. Augustine and Hastings.

Clay County has a mandatory evacuation for Zones A, B, and C as well as low lying, modular, or vulnerable homes for Saturday at 6AM.

Baker County has issued a mandatory evacuation of all residents of Steel Bridge Road- east of the collection site, all residents of Webb Haven Road, Persimmon and Ash Road in the Turkey Creek II neighborhood, Myrtle, Camphor, Chestnut, and Gum Roads, all residents on the west side of Aspen Road, all residents on Lil Dixie Trail, all residents on River Oak Circle, all residents on River Oak Drive, all residents on Confederate Drive East, all residents of Cedar Creek Farms Road. You’re also encourages to seek shelter if you’re in a mobile home or compromised shelter.

The Florida Department of Corrections has evacuated Bridges of Jacksonville.

Tolls have been lifted across the state to aid in evacuations.

PRE-STORM RESOURCES

The City of Jacksonville has opened 12 shelters. Find locations HERE.

Baker County opened two shelters, one for the general population and one for special needs. More details HERE.

Clay County has announced the opening of four shelters. Find locations HERE.

St. Johns County is opening five shelters on Saturday morning at 6 AM. Info posted HERE.

Nassau County is open five shelters, starting 6 PM Friday. More info HERE.

City Rescue Mission currently provides shelter for 250 people. They are providing accommodations for 100 additional people at City Rescue Mission's New Life Inn, 234 W. State Street, Jacksonville, FL 32202, Friday at noon.

The Salvation Army’s Towers Center of Hope at 900 W. Adams Street in downtown Jacksonville will open its shelter to the homeless. The shelter will open as weather dictates and will remain open as long as needed.

JTA has three designated locations for anyone evacuating from the beaches who doesn’t have transportation: Fletcher High School, Mayport Middle School, and Jacksonville Beach Elementary School. 

Florida Governor Rick Scott has ordered all K-12 public schools, state colleges, state universities, and state offices to be closed Friday through Monday so the facilities can be used for sheltering and emergency management operations.

Nassau County Emergency Management says the Town of Callahan is out of fuel and all gas station will be closed until Tuesday.

Airbnb activated its Disaster Response Program to aid Floridians forced to evacuate from their homes in connection to Hurricane Irma as well as relief workers arriving to provide assistance.  

Beginning at 12:01 a.m. Eastern on September 9 and running through midnight on September 11, Verizon is giving postpaid customers talk, text and data relief while prepaid customers receive an extra 3 GB for talk, text and data.

Through the storm period for our area, St. Vincent's HealthCare is offering FREE 24-hour non-emergency virtual care via video chat through our new service called St. Vincent's On Demand.  Because of how the St. Vincent's On Demand system is set up, patients will need to pay the $49.99 fee up front, but their credit cards will be refunded 2 - 3 days after the visit if it's within the storm period.

As Hurricane Irma continues to make its way north we’re automatically issuing credits and waiving additional fees to give unlimited data, talk and texts to AT&T wireless customers and unlimited talk and texts to AT&T PREPAID customers across all of Florida, through at least Sept. 17.

Updates: Power outages in Northeast Florida

Hundreds of thousands of people were without power across Northeast Florida at the peak of Hurricane Irma.  We are updating restoration efforts: 

Beaches Energy:  

JEA

JEA has been bringing in more resources from across the country to help with restoration efforts. The utility company has brought in over 700 line and tree-trimming workforce additions and assures they will continue to grow until they get the job done. 

CEO Paul McElroy says he does not have an exact time frame on when service will be restored to the customers still left without AC. 

JEA has several resources, including drones and helicopters they will use for complete assements.   They are still monitoring flooding, and how that will impact underground lines.

You are encouraged to call 630-CITY about outages and downed lines. 

Clay Electric Cooperative: 

Clay Electric has staged crews to help restore power. Crews from other areas of Florida and the country are part of the efforts across the Claye Electric service area. 

Florida Power and Light:

St. Johns County:  25,890 outages

Nassau County:   6,960 outages

Flagler County:   22,320 outages

Putnam County:  11,500 outages

Florida Light and Power says it has the largest ever restoration workforce of more than 21,000 in the field, and has restored power to nearly 65% of customers impacted by Hurricane Irma. 

FPL users are encouraged to use the app to get restoration times and messages as new information comes in. 

Okefenoke Rural Electric Membership:

Baker:  961

Nassau:  1,838

Insurance Answers

Damage from Hurricane Irma? How to navigate your insurance policy

Thousands of homeowners impacted by Hurricanes Irma and Harvey will have to figure out how to deal with insurance claims and all the complicated work that can go along with filing a claim in order to begin rebuilding their lives and their home. 

First, what kind of homeowner’s insurance do you need?

>> Read more trending news

Some policyholders mistakenly think they need to insure their house for its resale value. You should be insuring your house for its replacement value, which is the amount it will take to rebuild the home if it is destroyed by a covered peril, like a hurricane or a tornado.

Your insurance agent will provide you with an estimate, but experts also advise paying a contractor, engineer or a trained appraiser to place the right replacement amount on a house if you do not agree with your agent or company replacement cost amount. Be aware that these expert expenses could be the responsibility of the homeowner.

In the event your home is destroyed, your policy will pay up to the limits on your policy to rebuild your home. Some insurers have what is called an inflation guard contained in the policy. This will increase the amount of insurance on your home by a small amount each year to keep up with inflation.

>> Related: Hurricane Irma: Live updates

Some insurers pay only the replacement value stated in your insurance contract, while others will provide a cushion of up to 25 percent. The replacement estimate may not take into account a surge in demand after a storm that could increase the cost of supplies and labor.

Contents coverage

Florida homeowners are allowed to waive coverage for furnishings and other contents. Some companies also allow consumers to pick the level of contents coverage. Insurers used to give consumers coverage pegged at a certain value of their structure — 50 percent was common — even if their furnishings and belongings were minimal.

Windstorm coverage

Florida statute 627.712 allows homeowners to exclude coverage for wind events in some cases. Most mortgage holders, however, require wind coverage.

To waive wind coverage, a homeowner must provide a letter from their lender that says it is all right with the lender if the insured drops the coverage. The savings from a policy by dropping windstorm coverage could be substantial, up to half of the total premiums paid.

Even so, use caution before dropping the coverage, because it comes with a high risk. It’s not just hurricanes that it covers, but any wind scenario. That would include a tree falling on your house if it did so as a result of a strong wind and not just a hurricane.

>> Related: NASA astronaut captures eerie images of Hurricane Irma’s destruction from space

Raising deductibles

An option that could offer substantial premium savings is raising your deductible. Your mortgage company might be able to veto such a move. Most insurers offer hurricane deductible of $500, 2 percent, 5 percent and 10 percent.

Florida Statute 627.701 allows insurers to offer deductibles beyond the 10 percent, but not all insurers offer larger deductible options. To have a deductible in excess of 10 percent, the home must be valued at less than $500,000 and the policyholder must provide to the insurer a letter, written in his or her own hand, saying what amount in deductible they are willing to pay.

Permission must also be obtained by the mortgage company if applicable. Calculate whether you could make repairs yourself in the event of a catastrophic event. Do you have $30,000 on hand, the amount you would pay if you took a 15 percent deductible, and your house suffered $200,000 worth of damage?

>> Related: Hurricane Irma damage: What to do before, during and after a flood

You will want to check your state's current laws before the storm hits to make sure you are covered after the storm.

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No Power? Here's Some Fridge Tips

Here's What to Keep and Throw Out After a Power Outage

Here's What to Keep and Throw Out After a Power Outage

Keep the butter, toss the eggs: What to keep, throw away if you lost power after Irma

With millions of people having lost power due to Hurricane Irma,  thousands of pounds of spoiled food come along with the end of the catastrophic storm.

>> Read more trending news 

Even for those who followed the golden rules of keeping your food safe, like keeping your refrigerator door closed and placing your perishable items in the freezer, some foods simply may not be worth saving after a power outage of 24 hours or more.

If you’re going through your fridge over the next few days, we’ve got you covered.

Here’s a list of what food you can keep and what should be thrown out after a power outage:

Tip: Discard any perishable food, including meat, poultry and seafood, that has been above 40 degrees F for more than 2 hours.

What to throw out:

Eggs

Cheese

Yogurt

Sour cream

Cut fruit

Condiments

Biscuits

What to keep:

Butter

Margarine

Fruit juice

Canned fruits

Whole fruits

Jams

Pickles

Vinegar-based dressings

Soy sauce

Mustard

Olives

Ketchup

Bread 

Rolls

Muffins

Tortillas

Waffles

Pancakes

Raw vegetables

Fruit pies

Herbs

Read more about food safety here.

Other Related Headlines

5 hacks to keep your smartphone charged during a power outage

A smartphone can be a lifeline in a storm, but it's useless without power. Fortunately, there's never been more ways to keep a smartphone juiced up

Here are some easy ways to keep your phone in the green if you lose power: 

1. Charge up every laptop in your home. If you lose power, turn a laptop on (but don't unlock the screen) and use your iPhone or Android cable to charge your phone via the USB ports. Most newer laptops can charge a smartphone multiple times. 

2. Keep your phone on "Low Power Mode." This setting will use far less juice. On an iPhone, go to "Settings," scroll down to "Battery" and turn on "Low Power Mode." On an Android, swipe down from the top menu and find the "Power Saving" icon. 

3. Use your car to charge your phone. Most newer cars have a USB port – or two. Even if your car is out of fuel, you can turn it on and charge it using the car battery. It's a last resort, but if you have a newer car battery, it will charge a phone multiple times easily.

 >> Read more trending stories

4. Buy an external charger if you don't have one; most drug stores have them. Portable smartphone battery chargers are getting better and less expensive. Most drug store chains have them near the counter, but you will pay more for the convenience. But if you need one right now, that is a good place to look. 

Companies such as Anker and Aukey sell high-quality, high capacity chargers on Amazon. Consider buying one before the next storm. Some of the new one have capacities approaching 30,000 mAh, which is enough to charge an phone over five times. 

5. Still have power but want to charge a phone quickly without using a wall socket? Plug it into the USB port on your TV. Most newer TVs have one. 

 

Family emergency supply kit must-haves

Emergency Supplies:

Water, food, and clean air are important things to have if an emergency happens. Each family or individual's kit should be customized to meet specific needs, such as medications and infant formula. It should also be customized to include important family documents..

Recommended Supplies to Include in a Basic Kit:

     
  • Water, one gallon of water per person per day, for drinking and sanitation
  • Food, at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food
  • Battery-powered radio and a NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert, and extra batteries for both
  • Flashlight and extra batteries
  • First Aid kit
  • Whistle to signal for help
  • Infant formula and diapers, if you have an infant
  • Moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for personal sanitation
  • Dust mask or cotton t-shirt, to help filter the air
  • Plastic sheeting and duct tape to shelter-in-place
  • Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities
  • Can opener for food (if kit contains canned food)

Clothing and Bedding:

If you live in a cold weather climate, you must think about warmth. It is possible that the power will be out and you will not have heat. Rethink your clothing and bedding supplies to account for growing children and other family changes. One complete change of warm clothing and shoes per person, including:

     
  • A jacket or coat
  • Long pants
  • A long sleeve shirt
  • Sturdy shoes
  • A hat and gloves
  • A sleeping bag or warm blanket for each person

Below are some other items for your family to consider adding to its supply kit. Some of these items, especially those marked with a * can be dangerous, so please have an adult collect these supplies.

     
  • Emergency reference materials such as a first aid book or a print out of the information on www.ready.gov
  • Rain gear
  • Mess kits, paper cups, plates and plastic utensils
  • Cash or traveler's checks, change
  • Paper towels
  • Fire Extinguisher
  • Tent
  • Compass
  • Matches in a waterproof container*
  • Signal flare*
  • Paper, pencil
  • Personal hygiene items including feminine supplies
  • Disinfectant*
  • Household chlorine bleach* - You can use bleach as a disinfectant (diluted nine parts water to one part bleach), or in an emergency you can also use it to treat water. Use 16 drops of regular household liquid bleach per gallon of water. Do not use scented, color safe or bleaches with added cleaners.
  • Medicine dropper
  • Important Family Documents such as copies of insurance policies, identification and bank account records in a waterproof, portable container

Bread and milk: Why do we panic-buy those foods before a storm?

Whenever severe winter weather approaches, grocery store aisles are always clear of eggs, bread and milk.

But why is that the case?

>> Read more trending stories

The CDC recommends bread as a no-cook food to stock ahead of a storm, but not perishables like milk and eggs. A power outage means those foods may not last until the storm passes.

The Atlantic reported that buying perishables may be a matter of psychology.

 Duke University behavioral economist Dan Ariely said it’s a matter of seeing others doing something and feeling the need to join in. “If we go somewhere and we see other people buying those particular things, all of a sudden (we’re) even more interested in those (things),” he said.

“It’s like saying, ‘The storm will be over soon and I won’t be stuck in this situation for long,’” clinical psychologist Judy Rosenburg told HowStuffWorks.

So it may be fine to get bread, milk and eggs as long as you have enough non-perishable foods as well.

  Getty

Hurricane Irma damage: What to do before, during and after a flood

Emergency management  officials are quick to remind those living in coastal areas that it’s the water that a hurricane brings that is the biggest threat to lives and property.

According to the National Hurricane Center, storm surge, or the wall or water a hurricane pushes on land as it moves onshore, has accounted for about half of the deaths in hurricanes since 1970.

The danger of storm surge is so great that in 2017, the NHC changed its warning system to include a separate warning for surge alone. 

While you can do very little once the surge is at hand, there are some things you can do to stay safe from the flood waters it brings.

From the Federal Emergency Management Agency, here are tips for keeping safe during and after a flood.

Before a flood • If a flood is likely in your area, listen to the radio or television for information.• Know the difference between a flood watch and a flood warning. A watch means flooding is possible. A warning means flooding is occurring or will occur soon.

When a flood is imminent• Be prepared! Pack a bag with important items in case you need to evacuate. Don't forget to include needed medications.• If advised to evacuate your home, do so immediately.• If there is any possibility of a flash flood, move immediately to higher ground.• If possible, bring in outdoor furniture and move essential items to an upper floor.• Turn off utilities at the main switches or valves if instructed to do so. Disconnect electrical appliances.

During a flood• Do not walk through moving water. As little as 6 inches (15 centimeters) of moving water can make you fall.• If you have to walk in water, wherever possible, walk where the water is not moving. Use a stick to check the firmness of the ground in front of you.• Do not drive into flooded areas. If floodwaters rise around your car, abandon the car and move to higher ground if you can do so safely.• Do not touch electrical equipment if you are wet or standing in water.

After a flood• Listen for news reports to learn whether the community's water supply is safe to drink.• Avoid floodwaters; water may be contaminated by oil, gasoline, or raw sewage. Water may also be electrically charged from underground or downed power lines.• Avoid moving water.• Be aware of areas where floodwaters have receded. Roads may have weakened and could collapse under the weight of a car.• Stay away from downed power lines, and report them to the power company.• Return home only when authorities indicate it is safe.• Stay out of any building if it is surrounded by floodwaters.• Service damaged septic tanks, cesspools, pits, and leaching systems as soon as possible. Damaged sewage systems are serious health hazards.• Clean and disinfect everything that got wet. Mud left from floodwater can contain sewage and chemicals.

Source: U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency

How to keep your kids entertained and your sanity when trapped at home by severe weather

When severe weather traps you inside your home with your children, whether in the aftermath of a hurricane or during less severe bad weather and power outages, there are things you can do to keep kids entertained while you keep your sanity.

>> Read more trending news

If you're home for the day, or a few days, here are a few things you can do to stay entertained without going crazy or running up your data plans.

If you still have power:

Do some family-friendly baking:

One way to keep kids occupied is with a slew of simple cooking tasks (cracking eggs, manning the mixing bowl) and the promise of sweets.

Cooking Light has a roundup of “kid-friendly desserts,” including gluten-free s'more bars, chewy caramel apple cookies and more. If you run through that list, the Food Network has another.

And not having kids is no reason not to bake in bad weather: for company, just sub in the closet available roommates, family, friends or pets. (This advice applies to the rest of the list.)

>> Related: Hurricane Irma: What to do about fallen trees and how to stop the danger

Check out these party games:

Jackbox's Drawful is a bizarre twist on Pictionary: players score points not just for drawing the best possible version of, say, "angry ants"; but also for getting other players to guess their answer for a given drawing instead of the correct one.

Drawful comes packaged as part of the Jackbox Party Pack and is available to buy and download here, and is compatible with the Xbox One, PlayStation 4, Amazon Fire TV and others. All you need to play is a phone, tablet or controller. 

But if you're feeling more competitive and less artistic, consider QuizUp. Available for both iPhone and Android. This competitive trivia app pits two players against each other in seven rounds of questions in one of several hundred different categories, including pop culture and academia. And it's free. 

Get crafty:

Create a crafting area in your home. Fill it with crafting materials like tape, paper and boxes. When inspiration strikes your child, they can create fun things in their own “workshop.”

Without power:

Get clever:

When the house goes dark, kids’ imaginations light up. A trip to the bathroom with a flashlight can become an adventure, and reading stories by candlelight will stick with them more than just another movie night. 

Get ahead of a power outage:

Stock up on glow sticks. Kids can really have fun with these simple light sticks. Once you crack them, they provide a bright light for up to 12 hours and a dim light for as long as 36 hours. They come in all kinds of shapes, sizes and colors, and can provide hours of fun for children.

>> Related: Hurricane Irma aftermath: Drone video shows St. Augustine damage

Build a fort:

Kids love building forts just for fun anyway. So if you find yourself in the dark without power, gather up pillows and blankets, and plan on moving some furniture around to help your little ones build the perfect fortress. You can even make it more like an adventure. Plan to snuggle in for the night, and maybe tell a few ghost stories, too.

Pool damage from Hurricane Irma, or any storm? Here’s what to do

Hurricane Irma barreled through Florida over the weekend and is now making its way as a tropical storm through parts of the southeast. The powerful Category 5 hurricane left a path of destruction in its wake from the Caribbean to Florida.

>> Read more trending news

Here are tips for protecting your pool before a hurricane, and how to get back up and running after.

Preparing a pool for a hurricane or storm:

-Don’t drain the water from your pool. Leave the water level alone. Draining it, so it doesn’t overflow, is pointless. If you drain it more than a few feet below normal and the ground gets saturated, the pool’s shell could pop out of the ground (even with concrete pools). Water provides weight to hold the sides and bottom in place.

-Turn off the power to the pump motor, lights and other equipment at the circuit box. Disconnect the gas from the heater; if possible, have your gas supplier or pool service disconnect it to be safe.

>> Related: Gas lines grow, pumps run dry: 8 tips to max out the fuel you have

-Consider removing diving boards or slides if you fear they won’t be secure in high winds. If you decide to remove them, try to have a professional do it.

-If the motor is exposed and you live in a flood-prone area, remove the pump and store it indoors. Otherwise, try to wrap it up with a waterproof cover and tie securely.

-Remove automatic pool cleaners, pool blankets and covers, and take them inside.

-Super-chlorinate or double the chemicals you normally add to reduce contamination and infestation by insects.

-Stock up on chemicals to “shock” pool after storm.

-Don’t throw patio furniture in the pool to keep it out of the wind; pool chemicals will harm the furniture and can mar the pool finish.

>> Related: Hurricane Irma: 9 weather terms you should know

After the storm has passed:

-Call the gas company or a pool company to reattach your gas line to the pool heater.

-Don’t reconnect electrical equipment until you’ve removed debris from the pool with a net, and power has been restored. Make sure electrical equipment is dry. Do this as quickly as possible before bacteria starts to grow.

-Don’t use your vacuum because debris will clog it and the pump.

-Then, if the area around the pool is dry, start the pump.

-When draining the pool tothe  proper level, remove cartridge filter or bypass the filter system.

-Super-chlorinate again. Remove any vegetative debris before treating the water. Add 5 gallons of chlorine (based on a 15,000-gallon pool) and start pump after inspecting electrical equipment to be sure it’s dry.

-Reset timers, if necessary.

>> Related: Photos: History’s most destructive hurricanes

-Closely watch the pump system through complete cycles for any problems.

-Wait 24 hours to see whether the water clears and turns blue. If it does, test water and follow instructions. If water is darker or black, pool may need to be drained, or partially drained, treated and refilled. Call a professional for this step.

-Balance pool chemicals and monitor for a few days.

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